Why Worry?

…There should be laughter after pain
There should be sunshine after rain
These things have always been the same
So why worry now?

whyworry_sunflower.jpg
Granted, the neighbors a couple hundred yards away at the end of our street still can’t get out of their driveways, and the basketball games have been canceled down at the city park…
no_basketball.jpg
But the sun is warm, the skies are clear, the river slowly is receding and all, apparently, is forgiven, as April flooding gives way to budding (or something like that).
shellginger2.jpgcactus_sunrise.jpgcrinkle_hibiscus.jpg
Aside from this last water event, spring has been pretty splendid, with flower and fruit and tomato springing forth and suggesting, gently, that maybe this year will be better than the last…

Posted in Brazos River, Nature

It Rains

Untitled.jpg
Torrential rain came down yesterday pretty much as advertised, leaving many of Houston’s major traffic arteries – and parked cars – covered in water. Here in the outback, runoff from the north-central part of the state poured into the Brazos River so that at our place it rose from 15 to 42 feet within about 24 hours and now flows past my tomato garden.

The fire marshal came by yesterday evening to make sure we were properly on-edge about the high water, as the river is supposed to rise another 6 or 7 feet, but the truth is that we can handle it without worry. The wild card involves whether the weather pattern sets up again to create slow-moving thunderstorms out of the moist clouds floating north from the Gulf of Mexico.

One would prefer this latter does not happen, if one were me.

Otherwise, it’s been a mere minor inconvenience for us. The fruit and milk trucks didn’t make it to the local grocery yesterday, so I bought no bananas but did manage to snag the last gallon of 2% milk, and the dogs made a mess of the kitchen floor every time they returned inside from a jaunt in the soggy yard. So it goes.

Posted in Brazos River, Nature, Uncategorized

So It Begins

You know it’s probably going to be a swell day when the pre-dawn weather forecast discussion begins with “Severe historic flood event ongoing,” and then you check out back and there’s a small lake where your yard usually resides…

backyard_flood.jpg

The Brazos River, farther out back than this picture, has been running slightly high at a depth of 16 feet. By this time tomorrow, so says the National Weather Service, it will rise to more than 49 feet. Volume-wise, the water flow will increase from the current approximate 9,000 cubic feet per second to about 72,000 cubic feet per second, in less than 24 hours’ time.

We have never heard of something like this happening in such a short time. It should be interesting…

Posted in Be Afraid, Brazos River, Nature, Texas

Forest For The Trees

How could I forget that certain charm, aging grit and paradoxical character of my own adopted home town? Every day I traverse its streets, the imagery burning patterns into my brain. Those patterns become a constant textured lens through which I view the rest of the world. Eventually, I forget those patterns are there at all.

Sometimes you can’t see the forest for the trees. That’s my only explanation for not having a gallery of Richmond, Texas, official population: 11,863 as of 2013. As of now, that’s changed, and you can find the Richmond gallery here.

downtown.jpg

Posted in Photography